Sunday, September 22, 2013

WeWriWa and Snippet Sunday

Finally, my book, Betrothed to Mr. Darcy is available for sale, so for those of you who want more than just eight sentences, click here. 

The scene: Darcy and Bingley are discussing Mrs. Bennet. Darcy has suggested that her actions could damage their reputations.



Bingley shrugged---“What do I care about my reputation? I have money in the bank and soon I will marry the most beautiful and agreeable woman in all of England. You are the one who is overly concerned with the opinions of others, though why you care, I do not know.”
“I care,” Darcy’s firm voice emphasized his point, “because all a gentleman has is his reputation. Once he loses the good opinion of others, it is lost forever.”
“The good opinion of society can be bought and sold. The true love of a good woman, however, cannot.”

“It may not be able to be purchased, but it still comes at a hefty price,” Mr. Darcy said, then exited before Bingley could respond with more of his lovesick drivel.



Please be sure to visit all the other WeWriWa and Snippet Sunday participants. 


Blurb:  After a year of misunderstandings, misconceptions and missed opportunities, Miss Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy have finally opened their hearts to each other and will soon be wed. 

However, the path to the altar is no smoother than the path to engagement. When the loquacious Mrs. Bennet causes a scene in a London dressmaker’s shop it becomes clear to Lizzy Bennet that she will never be able to rein in her family’s improper and embarrassing behavior.

Although she has learned to live with the humiliation caused by her relatives, particularly her sister Lydia’s elopement with the scurrilous Mr. Wickham, Lizzy realizes the dire consequences of inflicting them upon Mr. Darcy and his vulnerable younger sister, Georgiana.

Mr. Darcy’s words from long ago reverberate in her brain: The situation of your mother's family, though objectionable, was nothing in comparison of that total want of propriety so frequently, so almost uniformly, betrayed by herself, by your three younger sisters, and occasionally even by your father.

Will Elizabeth’s sense of duty, combined with her profound love for Mr. Darcy, force her to call off the wedding in order to spare him, and his sister, the disgrace of a lifetime association with the Bennet family? Or will love find a way to prevail?

23 comments:

  1. I hope this wonderful book is doing very well for you! I always admire the way you get the tone so right. Yay for Mr. Bingley today!

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    1. Thank you! It appears that people other than my relatives have bought it, so I consider that a big success! You have been very kind to be so supportive over the last few months. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it.

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  2. I love the back and forth dialogue in this snippet. I'm going to have to add this to my to-read pile. Good luck!

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    1. What a wonderful compliment! Thank you. I must admit that I think I had more fun writing the conversations between the men than those w/the women (other than Mrs. Bennet who is a hoot to write). I don't think there are any actual scenes of just the two of them in P and P, just references to their conversations, so it's fun to imagine what it might have been like.

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  3. This is a marvelous snippet and from my memory nails the personalities of both men. Excellent.

    Absolutely the best of luck with this book. From the snippets I've read it deserves to do well.

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    1. Thank you so much. I'm a newbie and I can't believe how kind everyone has been. :)

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  4. I have two reviews left for the Pride and Prejudice Bicentenary challenge, and this one will give me three books to choose among. I look forward to reading it.

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    1. I meant to sign up for that challenge, but then writing a book just took too much time. I suppose I won't be around for the Tricentennial. But, I'd be honored if you reviewed my book. If you post it on your blog, please let me know. :)

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  5. I always like Mr. Bingley . . .

    And I hope Darcy realizes what he stands to lose personally, if he doesn't look out!

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    1. Well..at the risk of revealing a spoiler...Mr. Darcy does figure it out eventually.

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  6. Very good exchange. The words flow without effort, give an insight into the two characters. Nice, nice!
    Good luck with the book. Gosh, I wish people would just go out and buy the dratted book, not just read snippets! Mine and yours and everybody else's.

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    1. LOL. So right. Buy the dratted books! Of course, if my husband sees my Amazon bill he might think I did buy everyone's books. There are so many talented writers and good books out there, it's a shame it's so hard to get people to know about us. Thanks for stopping by.

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  7. Great use of the eights. Loved the words, 'hefty price' and 'lovesick drivel'. Very well done!

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    1. Thank you. Getting the hang of the Regency language is tricky but so much fun.

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  8. Great interplay between the two characters. And Mrs. Bennet sounds like a fun character. Good luck with the book sales!

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    1. Thanks! They're good friends and it's fun to write about them.

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  9. I'm really liking Mr. Darcy. Great 8.

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  10. Thanks. Mr. Darcy is very likeable, even if it took Lizzy a while to figure that out. :)

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  11. Very nice eight, Violet. Great exchange.

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  12. Great characterisation and dialogue as always.

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  13. I love the voice! Perfect for this story. :-) Well done! :-)

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  14. Love the testy banter between the two. You are right on the mark with the dialogue of the era too. It is just perfect!
    History Sleuth's Milk Carton Murders

    (Mine is still in edit phase, since you asked. :) )

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I love to hear from readers! Thanks for being part of the conversation.